Bondax

„There’s an old saying“ says George Townsend, „that it takes years of work to be an overnight success.“ Wise words indeed, but startling too. Indeed, it’s hard to believe that Bondax, the duo of George Townsend and Adam Kaye, have had the years to put into their work. After all, both are 18 years old and barely out of sixth form – surely theirs must just have been a lucky break, a couple of fluke big tunes that got spread on a wave of internet hype?

Well no, they really have put the hours in to get where they are now. „We met properly in year 11“ says Adam, „when we were doing our GCSEs. George had been producing for ages, I’d been in bands playing indie and stuff, and he asked me in to try and make some tunes. It was just fun at first, but the more we did it the more we realised… well, that we could make something quite decent!“

So that’s several years of George tinkering with computers and Adam learning his chops before they started working together, then another two years of learning to work as a duo before their tracks started gaining buzz online and being picked up by DJs and labels.

When the first buzz began to explode George took the bold step of dropping out of his A-levels to dedicate himself full time to building connections and setting the stage, so that when Adam finished his exams, they’d be able to leap in to promotion and songwriting with both feet. Already they’ve played across Europe, rocked festivals and clubs and met some of their musical heroes, but they know it’s only just begun.

„We want to do this“ George says. „I knew I had a choice, to do my exams and do what everyone else does, or take a chance on doing something I love, going to parties, maybe building a totally different life.“ And they’re not just looking to the next dancefloor hit either, as Adam makes clear „we’re really conscious of not wanting to repeat ourselves“ he says, „and we want to do new things. We’re only just writing our album now, but we’re going to have songs, but songs treated differently so the structures aren’t what you expect. It’s got to keep the interest and not just be trying to do what’s current.“

That’s the same sense of perspective which George displayed in pointing out the work they needed to get where they are – and they both know there’s a lot of work still to do. It’s unusual to find any act who are so clear about what’s needed to go where they want to be, let alone an act that’s just out of school. But Bondax are a very unusual act, and one that’s arrived just at the right time. Though they may have all the hallmarks of „bass music“, the newest production techniques, tweaks and club rhythms, there’s something deeper underlying all their tracks which gives them both pop appeal and the possibility of the longevity they clearly want. It’s early days, of course, but there’s every chance that in years to come, they won’t be looked at alongside the hip club producers of the time, but in a category with Moby, Gorillaz, LCD Soundsystem and other such acts which have taken dance grooves to the biggest stages and the widest audiences.